THE BEE GEES

 


 

      THE BEE GEES

                     The Gibb Brothers


                                        

 

INDUCTED INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME IN 1997

 

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        The Brothers Gibb starting singing early in their lives in Manchester ,England under a few names which included THE RATTLESNAKES ,and the BLUE CATS but in 1958 their parents moved them to Australia  where they were known as The BROTHERS GIBB. The oldest brother, Barry writing the songs who was the only brother born in Manchester ,England while the fraternal twin brothers ,Robin and Maurice  were born on the Isle Of Man, assisted with harmony singing.  The group changed their name to the BEE GEES in 1962 but there are two stories of where the name came from. The First story is it is from the Brothers Gibb  and the second story is that it is from two early friends who were DJ's by the name of Bill Goode and Bill Gates. I will let you decide which story to believe. The group did good in Australia but could not get their music out of Australia . In late 1966 the group decided to return to England especially due to the British Invasion has hit already . The group had a record contract in Australia with a company called Festival Records and had just released a single before leaving the country called " Spicks and Specks " and had sent a copy of this single to a associate of Brian Epstein (The Beatles manager) Robert Sigwood. They signed a deal with him and their first single called" New York Mining Disaster 1941" made the top 20. This song was released in mid 1967. The groups records were released in Europe on Polydor and in America on Atlantic Records. The song Massachusetts launched the group to the top of the charts where they would stay throughout the 60's , 70's, 80's and even the 90's .  The group also paid great attention to their albums and made great lp's .

 

                                              

                                               SOME SONGS TO REMEMBER

                                             From the first era of the groups hits!!!

 

                                                            HOLIDAY

                                                            WORDS

                                                       MASSACHUSETTS

                                            NEW YORK MINING DISASTER

                                                            WORLD

                                                     I STARTED A JOKE

                                       I'VE GOTTA GET A MESSAGE TO YOU

 

The above songs if you are not familiar with them are soft harmony songs and are beautifully sang by the trio.  In 1968 the group ran into a rough period and then came back strong in 1970 with such hits as the songs listed below :

                                                  

                                                      LONELY DAYS

                                                       HOW CAN I MEND A BROKEN HEART

                                                      DON'T WANT TO LIVE INSIDE MYSELF

                                                       MELODY FAIR

                                                       DON'T FORGET TO REMEMBER

   

                                                                                                                                                     

 

        the next era of the group is what they became well known for even though they totally changed their style of singing. The Disco era  in the 70's brought the Bee Gees to the top of the record industry . The movie Saturday Night Live is what brought it all about .

                                     

 

                                           JIVE TALKIN

                                         STAYIN' ALIVE

                                          NIGHT FEVER

                                YOU SHOULD BE DANCING

                                     NIGHTS ON BROADWAY

                                   HOW DEEP IS YOUR LOVE

                                                TRAGEDY

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PRONOUNCED “MORRIS,”  BY THE WAY:

THE RARE, THE PRECIOUS, THE DEATH OF A BEE GEE

 

Gary Pig Gold

remembers

Maurice Gibb.

 

 

 

John Entwistle.  George Harrison.  So how come it’s the utterly coolest-by-far members of some of our all-time favorite bands who seem to be departing far, far too soon?

 

Maurice Gibb has gone truly horizontal on us as well.  And, like Messrs. Entwistle and Harrison, Maurice in many ways did appear to be “the quiet one” amongst his musical company, but really only to those who weren’t listening closely enough. 

 

On the surface certainly overshadowed by twin brother Robin’s other-worldly vibrato (not to mention Barry Gibb’s wholly Kennedyesque jumbo pin-up persona), Maurice was in truth the literally unsung hero behind the Bee Gees’ multitude of stage, studio, and especially compositional achievements.  For example, a la the so-called Quiet Beatle, his voice was always the key, if seemingly “ghost” harmony in the Gibbs’ intricate three-tiered vocal blend.  Plus Maurice’s sense of humor (off- and most pointedly back-stage as well) was every single inch the absurdly dark equal to that of The Who’s wickedly bottom-ended Ox-man, as even surface exposure to the Bee Gees’ vast library of unreleased “party tapes” will certainly reveal. 

 

So without him I suppose, Barry and Robin can always sing like Everly Brothers of course.  But won’t the Gibbs’ legendary Three Stoogeplay be reduced to mere Martin & Rossi without Maurice’s sweetly subtle Larry Finery?  I fear such eventualities are almost too tragic to even contemplate. 

 

On a less ominous tack, it is interesting to consider that sly-fox Maurice remained the only Gibb to never offer a full solo album up for public consumption (though not for lack of trying: When the group first split beneath a hail of chart-topping rancor in the late Sixties, Maurice launched sessions in earnest alongside then brother-in-law Billy Lawrie and even Ringo Starr for a long-player to be prophetically titled “The Loner.”  Check with your preferred file sharer to sample for yourself all the wily wonders well underway …before Barry and Robin came calling with what was to become that first of several Bee Gee comebacks, “Lonely Days”).  And on the subject of classy career revivals, when 2001’s glorious “This Is Where I Came In” unexpectedly put those Gibbs right back upon a plateau every note the equal of their mid-Seventies and even mid-Sixties glory daze, near complete credit for this sobering turn of fortunes was duly awarded to Maurice’s greatly increased role in what, alas, may very well be the Bee Gees’ swansongs. 

 

On the heels of this latest rebirth, Barry and Robin were reportedly dedicating every waking hour to keeping their physical and vocal chops at tip-top, road-ready level.  But Maurice?  Why, he was, so characteristically, consumed instead by a newfound passion for the utterly unmusical pursuit of Paintball combat, and his Royal Rat Rangers (I kid you not) team had just made the semi-finals at London’s Crystal Palace World Campaign Cup competitions!

 

So it only remains to suggest at this sad juncture that perhaps the entire world could benefit greatly if we all just took some time out as soon as possible for one great big round of global Paintball in Maurice’s matronly, peace-loving honor.  Because you just know he would be the first to gamely join in, with a spit and a grin, to fill as only he could that irreplaceable hole in our intricate harmonic fabric. 

 

Godspeed, Maurice.  You were far from a Loner in this world.     

 

 

www.GaryPigGold.com

 

 

 


 

 

                                    

 

ALBUMS

 

Studio Album chart performance

Album Title Highest US
Chart Position
Year Highest UK
Chart Position
"The Bee Gees Sing and Play 14 Barry Gibb Songs" - 1965 -
"Spicks and Specks" - 1966 -
"Bee Gees 1st" #7 1967 #8
"Horizontal" #12 1968 #16
"Idea" #17 1968 #4
"Odessa" #20 1969 #10
"Cucumber Castle" #94 1970 #57
"2 Years On" #32 1970 -
"Trafalgar" #34 1971 -
"To Whom It May Concern" #35 1972 -
"Life in a Tin Can" #68 1973 -
"Mr. Natural" #178 1974 -
"Main Course" #14 1975 -
"Children of the World" #8 1976 -
"Saturday Night Fever" #1 1978 #1
"Spirits Having Flown" #1 1979 #1
"Living Eyes" #41 1981 #73
"E.S.P." #96 1987 #5
"One" #68 1989 #29
"High Civilization" - 1991 #24
"Size Isn't Everything" #153 1993 #23
"Still Waters" #11 1997 #2
"This Is Where I Came In" #16 2001 #6

 

 

The Bee Gees have sold over 125 million albums world-wide.

 


 

SINGLES

 

  1. NEW YORK MINING DISASTER 1941
  2. I CAN'T SEE NOBODY
  3. TO LOVE SOMEBODY
  4. HOLIDAY
  5. MASSACHUSETTS
  6. BARKER OF THE UFO
  7. WORLD
  8. SIR GEOFFREY SAVED THE WORLD
  9. AND THE SUN WILL SHINE
  10. WORDS
  11. SINKING SHIPS
  12. JUMBO
  13. THE SINGER SANG HIS SONG
  14. I'VE GOT GET A MESSAGE TO YOU
  15. I STARTED A JOKE
  16. FIRST OF MAY
  17. MELODY FAIR
  18. TOMORROW TOMORROW
  19. SUN IN MY MORNING
  20. SAVED BY THE BELL
  21. DON'T FORGET TO REMEMBER
  22. IF ONLY I HAD MY MIND ON SOMETHING ELSE
  23. I.O.I.O.
  24. RAILROAD
  25. I'LL KISS YOUR MEMORY
  26. LONELY DAYS
  27. MORNING OF MY LIFE
  28. HOW CAN YOU MEND A BROKEN HEART
  29. COUNTRY WOMAN
  30. DON'T WANNA LIVE INSIDE MYSELF
  31. MY WORLD
  32. ON TIME
  33. RUN TO ME
  34. ALIVE
  35. SAW A NEW MORNING
  36. WOULDN'T I BE SOMEONE
  37. ELISA
  38. KING AND COUNTRY
  39. MR. NATURAL
  40. IT DOESN'T MATTER MUCH TO ME
  41. THROW A PENNY
  42. CHARADE
  43. JIVE TALKIN'
  44. NIGHT ON BROADWAY
  45. FANNY (BE TENDER WITH MY LOVE)
  46. YOU SHOULD BE DANCING (LONG VERSION)
  47. LOVE SO RIGHT
  48. BOOGIE CHILD
  49. EDGE OF THE UNIVERSE (LIVE VERSION)
  50. HOW DEEP IS YOUR LOVE
  51. STAYIN' ALIVE
  52. NIGHT FEVER
  53. MORE THAN A WOMAN
  54. IF I CAN'T HAVE YOU
  55. (OUR LOVE) DON'T THROW IT AWAY
  56. TOO MUCH HEAVEN
  57. TRAGEDY
  58. LOVE YOU INSIDE OUT
  59. E'S A LIAR
  60. ANOTHER LONELY NIGHT IN NEW YORK
  61. THE WOMAN IN YOU
  62. SOMEONE BELONGING TO SOMEONE
  63. TOYS
  64. E-S-P (DEMO VERSION)
  65. YOU WIN AGAIN
  66. ORDINARY LIVES
  67. ONE
  68. IN CONCERT: JULIET
  69. TO LOVE SOMEBODY
  70. MEDLEY: NEW YORK MINING DISASTER 1941, HOLIDAY, TOO MUCH HEAVEN, HEARTBREAKER, ISLANDS IN THE STREAM, RUN TO BE, WORLD - SPICKS AND SPECKS

 


 

AWARDS

 

The Bee Gees were inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997; fittingly, the presenter of the award to "Britain's first family of harmony"[6] was Brian Wilson, leader of the Beach Boys, America's first family of rock harmony. The Bee Gees were inducted into The Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2001 as well as the ARIA Hall of Fame in 1997.

 

[edit] Grammy Awards

 


 

 

History of the Group

 

Late 60's - First Fame

Before their departure from Australia to their native England, Hugh Gibb sent demos to Brian Epstein who managed The Beatles and was director of NEMS, a British music store and promoter. Brian Epstein had given the demo tapes to Robert Stigwood who recently joined NEMS. After an audition with Stigwood in February 1967, The Bee Gees were signed to a five-year contract where Polydor Records would be the Bee Gees' record label in the U.K. and ATCO Records would be the U.S. distributor. Work quickly began on their first international LP and Robert Stigwood launched a huge promotion to coincide with their first album.

Stigwood proclaimed that The Bee Gees were "The Most Significant New Talent Of 1967" and thus began the immediate comparison to The Beatles. Their first single, New York Mining Disaster 1941, was issued to radio station DJs with a blank white label with only the song title. Many DJs immediately assumed this was a new Beatles single and started playing the song in heavy rotation. This helped the song climb into the Top 20 in both the U.K. and the U.S. Only later did they realize that it was not The Beatles but in fact The Bee Gees, when their second single was released, To Love Somebody and again climbed into the Top 20 in the U.S. Originally written for Otis Redding, "To Love Somebody" was a soulful ballad sung by Barry, which has now become a pop standard covered by hundreds of artists such as Rod Stewart, Janis Joplin, The Animals, Nina Simone, and Michael Bolton just to name a few. Another single, Holiday was released in the U.S. and peaked at #16. The parent album, Bee Gees 1st was one of the first debut albums in the rock era entirely written by the artists themselves. Not even the Beatles, Bob Dylan or The Rolling Stones can make that claim. "Bee Gees 1st" peaked at #7 in the U.S. and #8 in the U.K.

Following the success of "Bee Gees 1st", the band, (which now consisted of Barry on rhythm guitar, Maurice on bass, Vince Melouney on lead guitar and Colin Peterson on drums) began work on their second album. Released in late 1967, Horizontal repeated the success of their first album, which contained the #1 U.K. (#11 U.S.) single Massachusetts and the #7 U.K. single World. The sound of the album "Horizontal" had a more rock sound than their previous release, though ballads like "And The Sun Will Shine" and "Really And Sincerely" are standouts. "Horizontal" made the Top 20 on both sides of the Atlantic, peaking at #12 in the U.S. and #16 in the U.K. To promote the album, The Bee Gees made their first appearances in America playing live concerts and television shows such as The Ed Sullivan Show and Laugh In.

Two more singles followed in early 1968, the ballad Words (#15 U.S., #8 U.K.) and the double A-sided single Jumbo b/w The Singer Sang His Song. "Jumbo" was the Bee Gees least successful single to date only reaching #57 in the U.S., but managing to climb to #25 in the U.K. The Bee Gees felt that "The Singer Sang His Song" was the stronger of the two and in fact reached #3 in The Netherlands. The year 1968 saw The Bee Gees reach the American Top Ten with the singles I've Gotta Get a Message to You (#8 U.S., #1 U.K.) and I Started A Joke (#6 U.S.) which were culled from the band's third album Idea, which was another Top 20 album in the U.S. (#17) and the U.K. (#4). Following the tour and TV special to promote "Idea", Vince Melouney left the group feeling that he wanted to play more of a blues style music than the Gibbs were writing. Melouney did achieve one feat while with the Bee Gees, as his composition "Such A Shame" (from Idea) is the only song, on any Bee Gees album, not written by a Gibb brother.

By 1969, the cracks began to show within the group as Robin began to feel that Robert Stigwood had been favoring Barry as the leader of the group. They began to record their next album, which was to be a concept album called "Masterpeace", which evolved into the double-album Odessa. Most rock critics feel this is the best Bee Gees album of the 60's, with it's progressive rock feel on the title track and along side other genres on music as heard on "Marley Purt Drive" and "Give Your Best", both country-flavored tunes, and signature ballads such as "Melody Fair" and First Of May, which became the only single from the album. Robin, feeling that the flipside, "Lamplight" should have been the A-Side, quit the group in mid-1969 and launching a solo career which saw brief success in Europe with the #2 hit "Saved By The Bell" and the album Robin's Reign. Barry & Maurice continued as The Bee Gees, even recruiting their sister Leslie to appear with them on stage.

The first of many Bee Gees compilations, Best of Bee Gees was released featuring the non-LP singles Words and the new single Tomorrow, Tomorrow which was a moderate hit in the U.K. reaching #23, but stalling at #54 in the U.S. The album itself sold very well and reached the Top Ten in both the U.S. and the U.K.

While Robin was off on his own, Barry, Maurice & Colin continued on as The Bee Gees recording their next album, Cucumber Castle. There was also a TV special filmed to accompany the album, which was aired on the BBC in 1971. Colin Peterson played drums on the tracks recorded for the album, but was fired from the group after filming began and his parts were edited out of the final cut of the film. The leadoff single, Don't Forget to Remember was a big hit in the U.K. reaching #2, but was a disappointment in the U.S. only reaching #73. The next 2 singles, (I.O.I.O) and (If I Only Had My Mind On Something Else) barely scraped the charts and following the release of the album, Barry and Maurice parted ways and it seemed that The Bee Gees were finished. Barry recorded a solo album which never saw official release, though a single, "I'll Kiss Your Memory" was released without much interest. Maurice also recorded during this time, released the single "Railroad" and starred in West End musical "Sing A Rude Song".

 

 Early 1970s

The three brothers reunited in the later part of 1970, their feelings about the split perhaps reflected in many songs about heartache and loneliness. Although they had lost traction on the British charts, the Bee Gees hit #3 in America with "Lonely Days" (from the reunion LP 2 Years On) and had their first U.S. #1 with "How Can You Mend a Broken Heart?" (from Trafalgar). The trio's talents were included in the soundtrack for the 1971 film Melody as they performed several songs for the title. In 1972, they hit #16 with "Run to Me" from the LP To Whom It May Concern; the single also returned them to the British top ten for the first time in three years.

By 1973, however, the Bee Gees were in a rut. The album, Life in a Tin Can, and its lead-off single, "Saw a New Morning," sold poorly with the single peaking at #94. This was followed by an unreleased album (known as A Kick in the Head Is Worth Eight in the Pants).

On the advice of Ahmet Ertegün of their U.S. label Atlantic Records, Stigwood arranged for the group to record with famed soul music producer Arif Mardin. The resulting LP, Mr. Natural, included few ballads and foreshadowed the R&B direction of the rest of their career. But when it too failed to attract much interest, Mardin encouraged them to work with the soul music style.

The brothers attempted to assemble a live stage band that could replicate their studio sound. Lead guitarist Alan Kendall had come on board in 1971, but did not have much to do until Mr. Natural. For that album, they added drummer Dennis Bryon, and they later added ex-Strawbs keyboard player Blue Weaver, completing the late 1970s "Bee Gees band". Maurice, who had previously performed on piano, guitar, organ, mellotron, and bass guitar, as well as exotica like mandolin and Moog, now confined himself to bass onstage.

At Eric Clapton's suggestion, the brothers relocated to Miami, Florida, early in 1975 to record. After starting off with ballads, they eventually heeded the urging of Mardin and Stigwood and crafted more rhythmic disco songs like "Jive Talkin'" and "Nights on Broadway." The latter featured Barry Gibb's first attempts at singing falsetto, in the backing vocals toward the end. The band liked the resulting new sound, and this time the public agreed, sending the LP Main Course, which became their first R&B album, up the charts. Barry Gibb's falsetto would become a staple of subsequent recordings. Mardin was unable to work with the group afterwards, but the Bee Gees enlisted Albhy Galuten and Karl Richardson who had worked with Mardin during the Main Course sessions. This production team would carry the Bee Gees through the rest of the 1970s.

The next album, Children of the World, was drenched in Barry's newfound falsetto and Blue's synthesizer disco licks. Led off by the single "You Should Be Dancing," it pushed the Bee Gees to a level of stardom they had not previously achieved in the USA, though their new R&B/disco sound was not as popular with some die hard fans from the 1960s. The Bee Gees' band was now closer to a rock act, with rhythm guitar and real drums behind the falsetto.

 

 Late 1970s: Saturday Night Fever

This song rocks following a successful live album, Here at Last… The Bee Gees… Live, The Bee Gees agreed to participate in the creation of the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. It was the turning point of their career. The cultural impact of both the film and the soundtrack was tremendous not only in the United States but also in the world, bringing the nascent disco scene into the mainstream.

Three Bee Gees singles ("How Deep Is Your Love", "Stayin' Alive", and "Night Fever") reached #1 in the United States and most countries around the world, launching the most popular period of the disco era. They also penned the song "If I Can't Have You" which became a #1 hit for Yvonne Elliman. Such was the popularity of Saturday Night Fever that two different versions of the song "More Than a Woman" received airplay, one by The Bee Gees, which was the B-side of "Stayin' Alive," and another by Tavares, which was the hit. The Gibb sound was inescapable. During an eight-month period beginning in the Christmas season of 1977, the brothers wrote six songs that held the #1 position on the U.S. charts for 25 of 32 consecutive weeks-- three under their own name, two for brother Andy Gibb, and the Yvonne Elliman single.

Fueled by the movie's success, the album broke multiple records, becoming the highest-selling album in recording history to that point. Saturday Night Fever has since sold circa 40 million copies worldwide, making it the best selling soundtrack album of all time.

During this era, Barry and Robin wrote "Emotion" for Samantha Sang, who made it a Top Ten hit (the Bee Gees sang back-up vocals). A year later, Barry wrote the title song to the movie version of the Broadway musical Grease for Frankie Valli to perform, which went to #1. At one time, five songs written by the brothers Gibb were in the U.S. top ten at the same time. It was the first time this kind of chart dominance had been seen since April 1964, when the Beatles had all five of the top-five American singles. In 1978, Barry Gibb became the only songwriter to have four straight number one hits in the U.S.A, breaking the John Lennon and Paul McCartney 1964 record. These songs were "Stayin' Alive", "Love Is Thicker Than Water", "Night Fever", "If I Can't Have You".

In 1976, the Bee Gees recorded three Beatles cover songs "Golden Slumbers/Carry that Weight", "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window" and "Sun King" for the transitory musical documentary All This and World War II. The three Bee Gees also co-starred with Peter Frampton in the movie Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1978) loosely inspired by the classic Beatles album released in 1967. The film had been heavily promoted prior to release, and was expected to enjoy great commercial success. However, the disjointed film was savaged by the movie critics, and ignored by the public.

During this period, the Bee Gees' younger brother Andy followed his older siblings into a music career, and enjoyed considerable success. Produced by Barry, Andy Gibb's first three singles all topped the U.S. charts.

The Bee Gees' follow-up to Saturday Night Fever was the Spirits Having Flown album. It yielded three more #1 hits: "Too Much Heaven", "Tragedy", and "Love You Inside Out." This gave the act six consecutive #1 singles in America within a year and a half (a record surpassed only by Whitney Houston). "Too Much Heaven" ended up as the Bee Gees' musical contribution to the Music for UNICEF Concert at the United Nations General Assembly in January 1979, a benefit organized by the Bee Gees, Robert Stigwood, and David Frost for UNICEF that was broadcast worldwide. The brothers donated the royalties from the song to the charity.

The Bee Gees even had a country hit in 1979 with "Rest Your Love On Me", the flip side of their pop hit "Too Much Heaven", written by Barry and made the Top 40 on the country charts. In 1981, Conway Twitty took "Rest Your Love On Me" to the top of the Country charts.

The Bee Gees' overwhelming success rose and fell with the disco bubble. By the end of 1979, disco was rapidly declining in popularity, and the backlash against disco put the Bee Gees' American career in a tailspin. Following their remarkable run from 1975–79, the act would have only one more top ten single in the U.S. and not until 1989. The Bee Gees' international popularity sustained somewhat less damage.


 

ANOTHER RUN DOWN OF THE GROUP

 

The three Gibb brothers (Barry and fraternal twins Robin and Maurice), sons of English bandleader Hugh Gibb, started performing in 1955. They moved with their parents to Brisbane in 1958 and worked talent shows and other amateur outlets, singing sets of Everly Brothers songs and an occasional Barry Gibb composition, by this time calling themselves the Bee Gees. They signed with Australia’s Festival Records in 1962 and released a dozen singles and two albums in the next five years. Then as now, close high harmonies were the Bee Gees’ trademark, and the Gibbs wrote their own material.

They hosted a weekly Australian TV show, but their records went unnoticed until 1967, when “Spicks and Specks” hit #1 after the Bee Gees had relocated to En¬gland. There they expanded to a quintet with drummer Colin Peterson and Vince Melouney (both Australians) and found themselves a new manager, Robert Stigwood, then employed by the Beatles’ NEMS Enterprises. Their first Northern Hemisphere single, “New York Mining Disaster 1941,” was a hit in both the U.K. and the U.S. (#14, 1967), and was followed by a string of equally popular ballads: “To Love Somebody” (#17, 1967), “Holiday” (#16, 1967), “Massachusetts” (#11, 1967), “Words” (#15, 1968), “I’ve Got to Get a Message to You” (#8, 1968), and “I Started a Joke” (#6, 1969). Their clean-cut neo-Edwardian image and English-accented three-part harmonies were a variation on the Beatles’ approach, although the Bee Gees leaned toward ornate orchestration and sentimentality as opposed to American-style straight-ahead rock.

Cracks in their facade began to show in 1969, when the nonfamily members left the group and reports of excessive lifestyles and fighting among the brothers surfaced. From mid-1969 to late 1970 Robin tried a solo career and had a #2 U.K. hit, “Saved by the Bell.” Meanwhile, Barry and Maurice (then married to singer Lulu) recorded Cucumber Castle as a duo and cut some singles individually. The trio reunited for two more hit ballads - the gold “Lonely Days” (#3, 1970) and “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart” (#1, 1971) - before bottoming out with a string of flops between 1971 and 1975. Stigwood effected a turnabout by recruiting producer Arif Mardin, who steered them to the funk-plus-falsetto combination that brought them their third round of hits. Main Course (#14, 1976), including “Jive Talkin’” (#1, 1975) and “Nights on Broadway” (#7, 1975), caught disco on the upswing and gave the Bee Gees their first platinum album.

In 1976 Stigwood’s RSO label broke away from its parent company, Atlantic, rendering Mardin unavailable to the Bee Gees. Engineer Karl Richardson and arranger Albhy Galuten took over as producers, and the group continued to record with Miami rhythm sections for hits such as “You Should Be Dancing” (#1, 1976) and a ballad, “Love So Right” (#3, 1976), which recalled the Philly-Motown influence. By this point, the brothers had relocated to Miami. Stigwood, meanwhile, had produced the film versions of Jesus Christ Superstar and Tommy, and asked the Bee Gees for four or five songs he could use in the soundtrack of a John Travolta vehicle about the mid-1970s Brooklyn disco scene, Saturday Night Fever. The soundtrack album, a virtual best-of-disco, included Bee Gees chart-toppers “Stayin’ Alive,” “Night Fever,” and “How Deep Is Your Love,” hit #1, stayed on the album chart for over two years, and eventually sold 30 million copies worldwide. Barry, with Galutan and Richardson, also wrote and produced hits for Yvonne Elliman, Samantha Sang, Tavares, Frankie Valli, and younger brother Andy Gibb [see entry] as well as the title tune for the film version of the Broadway hit Grease.

In 1978, with Saturday Night Fever still high on the charts, the Bee Gees started Music for UNICEF, donating the royalties from a new song and recruiting other hitmakers to do the same. They also appeared in Stigwood’s movie fiasco Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and continued to record. After Saturday Night Fever, even the platinum Spirits Having Flown (#1, 1979) with three #1 hits - “Too Much Heaven,” “Tragedy,” and “Love You Inside Out” - seemed anticlimactic. As of 1979, the Bee Gees had made five platinum albums and more than 20 hit singles.

Along with such phenomenal commercial success came a critical backlash. While the intense antidisco sentiment certainly played a role, the fact that one literally could not turn on a radio without hearing a Bee Gees track did not help. Their career then entered another dry season. In October 1980 the Bee Gees filed a $200 million suit against Stigwood, claiming mismanagement. Meanwhile, Barry produced and sang duets with Barbra Streisand on Guilty (1980). The lawsuit was settled out of court, with mutual public apologies, in May 1981. Living Eyes (#41, 1981) was the Bee Gees’ last album for RSO. They composed the soundtrack to Saturday Night Fever’s dismal sequel, Stayin’ Alive; the soundtrack went to #6 and platinum and included “Woman in You” (#24, 1983). Barry also wrote and produced an album for Dionne Warwick, Heartbreaker. With his brothers he cowrote Diana Ross’ “Chain Reaction” and the Kenny Rogers–Dolly Parton hit “Islands in the Stream.”

In 1987 the Brothers Gibb again joined forces and refired their singing career with E-S-P, which included “You Win Again” (#75, 1987). While these records appeared commercial disappointments in comparison to previous chart showings, in fact this was the case only in the U.S. E-S-P went to #1 in Germany and the Top 5 in the U.K. Thus began another phase of the Bee Gees’ history, in which their singles and albums would top the charts practically everywhere but the U.S.

In March 1988, their younger brother Andy Gibb died of myocarditis, a heart condition, at age 30. He had a long history of addiction to drugs and alcohol, and his surviving brothers were devastated by the loss. They retired for a time, and Maurice suffered a brief relapse of his alcoholism. They returned with One (German Top 5, U.K. Top 30) featuring the trio’s highest-charting single of the ’80s in its title track (#7, 1989), followed by High Civilization (1991), which did not even chart in the U.S. but hit #2 in Germany and the U.K. Top 30.

In 1997 the Bee Gees were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. They also released Still Waters (#11, 1997), which produced the minor hits “Alone” (#28, 1997) and “Still Waters (Run Deep)” (#57, 1997). A live album, One Night Only (#72, 1998), was the soundtrack to a live concert, which was filmed. Tomorrow the World and This Is Where I Came In (#33, 2001) followed. The group has twice received Britain’s Ivor Novello Trust for Outstanding Contribution to British Music (1988, 1997) and the BRIT Award (1997), all in recognition of their outstanding contribution to British music. In 1994 they were inducted into the Songwriters’ Hall of Fame. The Bee Gees continued to tour occasionally until January 2003, when Maurice Gibb died of cardiac arrest while receiving treatment for an intestinal blockage.

 


BEE GEES TRIVIA

TIMELINE

September 1, 1946: Barry Gibb was born.

December 22, 1949: Maurice Gibb was born.

December 22, 1949: Robin Gibb was born.

1963: ’ first single—"The Three Kisses of Love” b/w “The Blue and the Grey"—"is released in Australia.

July 1, 1966: signs the English group . Atlantic will become a major force in British rock, releasing albums by such artists as , Mott the Hoople, Yes, Genesis, Derek and the Dominos, Emerson, Lake and Palmer and .

January 9, 1967: The Gibb family moves from Australia to London, England. Within months, enjoy their first international hit: “New York Mining Disaster 1941” (#14 U.S., #12 U.K.).

August 9, 1967: debut album, ‘Bee Gees 1st’, is issued in America. At this point, the group is a quintet: the three Gibb brothers, plus guitarist Vince Melouney and drummer Colin Peterson.

December 9, 1969: The group’s brotherly bonds are temporarily broken as Robin departs for a short-lived solo career that yields the album ‘Robin’s Reign’ (1970). , pared down to the duo of Barry and Maurice, release ‘Cucumber Castle’.

August 7, 1971: hit #1 for the first time with “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart,” a mellow ballad from ‘Trafalgar’.

August 9, 1975: “Jive Talkin’” reaches #1 for the first of two weeks. Marking a change in direction, it finds moving from “dreary ballads” (their term) to a more uptempo, R&B sound, thanks in large part to Atlantic Records staff producer Arif Mardin.

September 4, 1976: “You Should Be Dancing” from the album ‘Children of the World’ becomes the latest Bee Gees single to top the charts. It is the third single to go to #1.

December 24, 1977: “How Deep Is Your Love,” ’ first single from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, hits #1 for the first of three weeks. Remaining in the Top Ten for 17 consecutive weeks, it sets a ‘Billboard’ chart record for longevity.

February 4, 1978: “Stayin’ Alive,” whose thunderous disco beat plays in the opening scene of ‘Saturday Night Fever’, reaches #1 for the first of four weeks.

March 12, 1978: Night Fever () was a hit.

December 31, 1978: Too Much Heaven () was a hit.

June 5, 1979: “Love You Inside Out” becomes ’ ninth #1 single, sixth consecutive #1 single (tying ), and fifth to sell over two million copies. It is also, to date, their last #1 single.

July 9, 1983: The soundtrack to Saturday Night Fever’s less successful sequel, ‘Stayin’ Alive’, is released. Again, contribute, notching one Top Forty single, “The Woman in You” (#24).

August 19, 1989: ’ 25th charting album, ‘One’, is released. The title track reaches #7 and the band tours for the first time in nearly a decade.

April 22, 1997: A new album by , ‘Still Waters’, is released as the group celebrates the 30th anniversary of its first hit. They undertake an 18-month world tour.

May 6, 1997: are inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at the twelfth annual induction dinner. Brian Wilson is their presenter.

January 12, 2003: Maurice Gibb of died.

 

Must Have Recordings


Stayin’ Alive
To Love Somebody
Words
How Can You Mend a Broken Heart
Jive Talkin’
How Deep is Your Love
New York Mining Disaster 1941
I’ve Got to Get a Message to You
Massachusetts
Too Much Heaven


                                                                               YOUNGER BROTHER -- ANDY GIBB

 

                                         

                            ABOVE IS A PICTURE OF ANDY GIBB

In the late 70's their 4th brother Andy Gibb had a solo career which was going hard and strong and his brother Barry was attempting to help him with his career as the Bee Gees continued on making more hits. Andy Gibb was a top teen idol of the era.  In 1979 the group played in the movie Srgt Pepper Lonely Hearts Club Band and did well with the music from this movie. However the movie did very bad at the box office. In 1988 their young brother Andy Gibb was falling due to drug abuse and finally passed away five days after his 30th birthday in 1988. The group did well in 1987 with their called "One" but it did due better in other countries rather in the USA.  The Bee Gees were inducted into the Rock N Roll Hall Of Fame in 1993. In 2003 Maurice passed away from a cardiac arrest . At this time Barry and Ribbon decided to stop performing as the Bee Gees .


PICTURES OF THE GROUP

 

                                   

BEE GEES IN THE MOVIE SGT PEPPER

 

                                        

 

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BEE GEES IN THE 1990's

 

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The Bee Gees Jump Suits


 

 

MEMBERS OF THE GROUP

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Barry Gibb

 

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ROBIN GIBB

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MAURICE  GIBB

 


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